"Every Frequency On 100 Block West Hastings" (2011)

"Every Frequency On 100 Block West Hastings" (2011)

Wood

49.5" x 99"

"Untitled" (8 Channel Audio Installation) (2011)

"Untitled" (8 Channel Audio Installation) (2011)

Collaboration with Jenni Schine.

8 Channel Audio, Wood, Amplifers, Speakers.

Co-Lab Installation Shot

Co-Lab Installation Shot

(2011) 

 

Co-Lab Installation Shot

Co-Lab Installation Shot

(2011) 

 

Co-Lab Installation Shot

Co-Lab Installation Shot

 (2011)

 

Co-Lab Installation Shot

Co-Lab Installation Shot

(2011) 

 

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Two Guitars, One Drum Set, and Polka Dot Pants Folded Neatly

Two Guitars, One Drum Set, and Polka Dot Pants Folded Neatly

C-Print 

20" x 20"

I was thinking about Picasso and his early paintings of instruments and how he was really able to flatten the objects within the frame. This interested me because music is often being “flattened” or reduced in some form. For example how a multi-track recording gets mastered down into a left and right stereo mix. There may be a multitude of tracks ranging from drums, guitar, bass, and vocals but the information is always processed through our two ears… I saw a similarity in how the medium of photography often has to reduce artworks such as sculpture or installation into a two-dimensional image… 

What I sought out to do was to create a photograph that relied heavily on compositional elements like lines, movement, and color but which was composed of a sculptural object.  

A Drum Set And A Pair Of Polka Dot Pants (2013)

A Drum Set And A Pair Of Polka Dot Pants (2013)

C-Print

20" x 20" 

I was thinking about Picasso and his early paintings of instruments and how he was really able to flatten the objects within the frame. This interested me because music is often being “flattened” or reduced in some form. For example how a multi-track recording gets mastered down into a left and right stereo mix. There may be a multitude of tracks ranging from drums, guitar, bass, and vocals but the information is always processed through our two ears… I saw a similarity in how the medium of photography often has to reduce artworks such as sculpture or installation into a two-dimensional image… 

What I sought out to do was to create a photograph that relied heavily on compositional elements like lines, movement, and color but which was composed of a sculptural object.  

"After The Moon Comes The Sun Then Again The Moon: Experimental Music For Electric Guitar, Bass And Drums". (2012)

"After The Moon Comes The Sun Then Again The Moon: Experimental Music For Electric Guitar, Bass And Drums". (2012)

 

Vancouver Art Gallery
Friday Nov. 9th 2012

IN MEDIAS RES performs "After The Moon Comes The Sun Then Again The Moon: Experimental Music For Electric Guitar, Bass And Drums". (2012)

Working with visual elements the performers consisting of Andrew Lee, Ryan Flowers, Ash Poon, Lindsey Hampton and Shaunn Watt will compose thematic sound works that have been informed by images and video by contributing artists Khan Lee, Mark Soo, Andy Dixon, Nicole Ondre and Derya Akay. 

Featuring Andrew Lee, Ash Poon, Ryan Flowers, Lindsey Hampton, Shaunn Watt
And Visual Artists: Khan Lee, Mark Soo, Andy Dixon, Nicole Ondre and Derya Akay

w/ Video Artist Sammy Chien

Programmed by Vanessa Kwan

"I Appear Neither On The Present Horizon Nor On The Telescopic Horizon Of The Generation (No.1)".  (2010)

"I Appear Neither On The Present Horizon Nor On The Telescopic Horizon Of The Generation (No.1)". (2010)

I Appear Neither On The Present Horizon Nor On The Telescopic Horizon Of The Generation (No.3), 2010

C-print

5 1/2" x 5 1/2”

I think what I am interested in in this photo are the dualisms that I see happening when presented with a landscape. You are looking out into the horizon but are ultimately also looking inward and becoming introspective. Other examples are: out vs. in, you vs. them, time vs. space, trancendence vs. immenence, etc. This all points to meaning making in general and I see language and words to also have that inherent complexity.  The phrase in the photo much like the image itself is just as complicated but I think that words come off with the air of authortative importance. (I guess it’s a Rene Magritte type experiment). It’s not just because words can be translated and defined in a dictionary where as an image might be more subtle – it’s also the way that words look and present themselves that give it its hegemony. So just as one might stare out into the horizon line thinking of something profound – the text in the photo acts to maybe neutralize any sense of the romantic and make it about the materials. – i.e. that it is a photo of a landscape not the landscape itself; and that there is text written over the photo detailing the two dimensional surfaceness. Which hopefully further brings the viewer back to a place of contemplation – asking questions as where am I and why is there funny text written over this photo.

 

"I Appear Neither On The Present Horizon Nor On The Telescopic Horizon Of The Generation (No.2)".  (2012)

"I Appear Neither On The Present Horizon Nor On The Telescopic Horizon Of The Generation (No.2)". (2012)

Andrew Lee, I Appear Neither On The Present Horizon Nor On The Telescopic Horizon Of The Generation (No.2), 2012

C-print

20 x 20

I think what I am interested in in this photo are the dualisms that I see happening when presented with a landscape. You are looking out into the horizon but are ultimately also looking inward and becoming introspective. Other examples are: out vs. in, you vs. them, time vs. space, trancendence vs. immenence, etc. This all points to meaning making in general and I see language and words to also have that inherent complexity.  The phrase in the photo much like the image itself is just as complicated but I think that words come off with the air of authortative importance. (I guess it’s a Rene Magritte type experiment). It’s not just because words can be translated and defined in a dictionary where as an image might be more subtle – it’s also the way that words look and present themselves that give it its hegemony. So just as one might stare out into the horizon line thinking of something profound – the text in the photo acts to maybe neutralize any sense of the romantic and make it about the materials. – i.e. that it is a photo of a landscape not the landscape itself; and that there is text written over the photo detailing the two dimensional surfaceness. Which hopefully further brings the viewer back to a place of contemplation – asking questions as where am I and why is there funny text written over this photo.

"I Appear Neither On The Present Horizon Nor On The Telescopic Horizon Of The Generation (No.3)". (2012)

"I Appear Neither On The Present Horizon Nor On The Telescopic Horizon Of The Generation (No.3)". (2012)

I Appear Neither On The Present Horizon Nor On The Telescopic Horizon Of The Generation (No.3), 2012

C-print

25 x 25

I think what I am interested in in this photo are the dualisms that I see happening when presented with a landscape. You are looking out into the horizon but are ultimately also looking inward and becoming introspective. Other examples are: out vs. in, you vs. them, time vs. space, trancendence vs. immenence, etc. This all points to meaning making in general and I see language and words to also have that inherent complexity.  The phrase in the photo much like the image itself is just as complicated but I think that words come off with the air of authortative importance. (I guess it’s a Rene Magritte type experiment). It’s not just because words can be translated and defined in a dictionary where as an image might be more subtle – it’s also the way that words look and present themselves that give it its hegemony. So just as one might stare out into the horizon line thinking of something profound – the text in the photo acts to maybe neutralize any sense of the romantic and make it about the materials. – i.e. that it is a photo of a landscape not the landscape itself; and that there is text written over the photo detailing the two dimensional surfaceness. Which hopefully further brings the viewer back to a place of contemplation – asking questions as where am I and why is there funny text written over this photo.

"Everything Up To The Sky And Down To The Centre Of The Earth".  (2010)

"Everything Up To The Sky And Down To The Centre Of The Earth". (2010)

Collaboration with Cheryl L'Hirondelle

Acrylic Tube and Earth.

Dimensions Variable

Audain Gallery, Vancouver
February 6 – March 20, 2010

With its roots in the local history of Vancouver, First Nations/Second Nature is an exhibition of works that mediate the politics of sites and shifting conceptions of territory. Produced by local, national and international artists, the works in the exhibition offer divergent engagements with the notion of the site, examined from a national to a local perspective, and defined by First Nations' conceptions of place and territory. First Nations/Second Nature is the inaugural exhibition at Audain Gallery.

Artists in the exhibition included Rebecca Belmore, Matthew Buckingham, Greg Curnoe, Sam Durant, Jimmie Durham, Andrea Geyer, Cheryl L’Hirondelle and Andrew Lee, Brian Jungen, and Patricia Reed.

Curated by Candice Hopkins, the Sobey Curatorial Resident of Indigenous Art at the National Gallery of Canada.

First Nations/Second Nature is part of the Vancouver 2010 Cultural Olympiad.

"Everything Up To The Sky And Down To The Centre Of The Earth"  (2010)

"Everything Up To The Sky And Down To The Centre Of The Earth" (2010)

Installation shot by Kevin Schmidt.

Audain Gallery, Vancouver, Canada.

Collaboration with Cheryl L'Hirondelle

Acrylic Tube and Earth.

Dimensions Variable

Audain Gallery, Vancouver
February 6 – March 20, 2010

With its roots in the local history of Vancouver, First Nations/Second Nature is an exhibition of works that mediate the politics of sites and shifting conceptions of territory. Produced by local, national and international artists, the works in the exhibition offer divergent engagements with the notion of the site, examined from a national to a local perspective, and defined by First Nations' conceptions of place and territory. First Nations/Second Nature is the inaugural exhibition at Audain Gallery.

Artists in the exhibition included Rebecca Belmore, Matthew Buckingham, Greg Curnoe, Sam Durant, Jimmie Durham, Andrea Geyer, Cheryl L’Hirondelle and Andrew Lee, Brian Jungen, and Patricia Reed.

Curated by Candice Hopkins, the Sobey Curatorial Resident of Indigenous Art at the National Gallery of Canada.

First Nations/Second Nature is part of the Vancouver 2010 Cultural Olympiad.

"Everything Up To The Sky And Down To The Centre Of The Earth" (2010)

"Everything Up To The Sky And Down To The Centre Of The Earth" (2010)

Installation shot by Kevin Schmidt.

Collaboration with Cheryl L'Hirondelle

Acrylic Tube and Earth.

Dimensions Variable

Audain Gallery, Vancouver
February 6 – March 20, 2010

With its roots in the local history of Vancouver, First Nations/Second Nature is an exhibition of works that mediate the politics of sites and shifting conceptions of territory. Produced by local, national and international artists, the works in the exhibition offer divergent engagements with the notion of the site, examined from a national to a local perspective, and defined by First Nations' conceptions of place and territory. First Nations/Second Nature is the inaugural exhibition at Audain Gallery.

Artists in the exhibition included Rebecca Belmore, Matthew Buckingham, Greg Curnoe, Sam Durant, Jimmie Durham, Andrea Geyer, Cheryl L’Hirondelle and Andrew Lee, Brian Jungen, and Patricia Reed.

Curated by Candice Hopkins, the Sobey Curatorial Resident of Indigenous Art at the National Gallery of Canada.

First Nations/Second Nature is part of the Vancouver 2010 Cultural Olympiad.

"Everything Up To The Sky And Down To The Centre Of The Earth" (2010)

"Everything Up To The Sky And Down To The Centre Of The Earth" (2010)

Mock Up.

"Everything Up To The Sky And Down To The Centre Of The Earth" (2010)

"Everything Up To The Sky And Down To The Centre Of The Earth" (2010)

Mock Up No.2

YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES "THERE ARE NO PROBLEMS IN ART". (2011)

YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES "THERE ARE NO PROBLEMS IN ART". (2011)

October 5, 2011 at Centre A (2 West Hastings Street)

Performance as part of the exhibition for YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES "THERE ARE NO PROBLEMS IN ART".
 

YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES "THERE ARE NO PROBLEMS IN ART" (2011)

YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES "THERE ARE NO PROBLEMS IN ART" (2011)

October 5, 2011 at Centre A (2 West Hastings Street)

Performance as part of the exhibition for YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES "THERE ARE NO PROBLEMS IN ART".
 

"The Things I Cannot Say To My Mother" (2008)

"The Things I Cannot Say To My Mother" (2008)

Sticky Notes

Dimensions Variable

"The Importance Of Water" (2008)

"The Importance Of Water" (2008)

Sticky Notes

Dimensions Variable

Hells Canyon

Hells Canyon

Centre For Performance Research (Brooklyn, NY). (2012)

Centre For Performance Research (Brooklyn, NY). (2012)

Performing live film score to the work of Steve Cossman.
March 20th. 2012

Center For Performance Research - 361 Manhattan Ave, Brooklyn.

SPATIAL POETICS XI: SOME MONSTER

SPATIAL POETICS XI: SOME MONSTER

The Powell Street Festival Society presents in partnership with SFU Woodward's Vancity Office of Community Engagement 

SPATIAL POETICS XI: SOME MONSTER 

Featuring: 
PEGGY LEE with DELIA BRETT
YOTA KOBAYASHI with BARRY DOUPÉ
ANDREW LEE with ALEX ZHANG HUNGTAI
Sound works by CINDY MOCHIZUKI & EMMA HENDRIX
Curated by VANESSA KWAN

Spatial Poetics XI: Some Monster is an evening of experimental and collaborative performances by an eclectic line-up of Asian Canadian artists. 

The thematic starting point for the eleventh edition of Spatial Poetics is the idea of the chimera or hybrid monster. While the theme conjures up long-held cultural ideas around fear and horror, these collaborative "beasts" also propose a gentler kind of interaction: one that is less about invoking terror, and more about encouraging the crossing of boundaries, the opening of unconventional relationships, and inviting diverse, creeping sensory experiences. 

Spatial Poetics XI: Some Monster features collaborations between: electro-acoustic sound composer Yota Kobayashi with animator Barry Doupé; musician visual artist Andrew Lee with musician Alex Zhang Hungtai; and experimental cellist Peggy Lee with dancer Delia Brett. The performances will be accompanied by a series of sound works collected by Cindy Mochizuki and Emma Hendrix.  

"The monstrous might be, in our popular imagination, a threat from outside us from the 'other' but it is also something to be experienced from inside our consciousness, an exercise in challenging our expectations, in the company of masterful, broad thinking artists," said Vanessa Kwan, curator of Spatial Poetics XI: Some Monster. "The format of Spatial Poetics is a perfect ground for this exploration." 

Spatial Poetics XI: Some Monster is a pre-festival event for the 36th Annual Powell Street Festival, held in Oppenheimer Park and surrounding venues on August 4th and 5th, 2012. 

"On The Other Side Of The Hoover Damn" (2010)

"On The Other Side Of The Hoover Damn" (2010)

C-Print

10" x 10"

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"Wiencouver X : Telepathic Music for Piano and Strings". (2013)

"Wiencouver X : Telepathic Music for Piano and Strings". (2013)

"Wiencouver X : Telepathic Music for Piano and Strings"
Hank Bull and Andrew Lee (2013)

Hank Bull in Vienna
Andrew Lee in Vancouver

Live radio performance
Kunstradio, ÖRF, Vienna
Listen: www.kunstradio.at

Sunday, October 27, 23:00h – 24.00h (UTC +1)
PST air time 15:00h (3:00pm) PST

Inspired by the grand tradition of Viennese chamber music and marking the 185th anniversary of the legendary Bösendorfer Piano Company, Hank Bull plays extended piano in Vienna, as Andrew Lee performs guitar and samples in Vancouver. 

The piano sounds are taken from recordings made inside the Bösendorfer factory. The noise of a piano’s construction extends its range, while the telematic connection stretches the harmonics of space. 

Hank Bull has been a participant in radio and telecommunications projects since the late 1970s.

Andrew Lee is a musician and visual artist based in Vancouver Canada.

Wiencouver is a virtual city somewhere between Vienna and Vancouver.

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